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By Lucy Puniwai | Agent in 76177
  • North Texas cities dominate nation's growth!

    Posted Under: Quality of Life in Denton County, Home Buying in Denton County, In My Neighborhood in Denton County  |  August 5, 2012 9:12 PM  |  625 views  |  No comments

    Five of the 15 fastest-growing cities in America are located in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex, according to new data from the U.S. Census Bureau.

    Plano, McKinney, Frisco and Denton all ranked in the top 10 fastest-growing cites, while Carrollton also cracked the top 15.

    Texas had eight of the 15 most rapidly growing large cities between Census Day (April 1, 2010) and July 1, 2011, according to population estimates for all of the nation's incorporated cities and towns released June 29 by the Census.

    "These estimates provide our first look at how much the total population has changed in each of our nation's cities since we conducted the 2010 Census," Census Bureau Director Robert Groves said, in a release. "These numbers provide further evidence of a continuation of the trend of rapid population growth in Texas we observed between the 2000 and 2010 censuses."

    Although Texas dominated the list as a whole, the fastest-growing large city was outside the state. Among cities with populations of 100,000 or more in 2010, New Orleans, still rebounding from the effects of Hurricane Katrina in 2005, ranked first, growing by 4.9 percent to 360,740. This puts the city's population at 79.2 percent of the pre-Katrina July 1, 2005, estimate of 455,188.

    Fort Worth had one of the largest numeric population increases in the country, adding 16,708 residents between April 2010 and July 2011. It was the 12th-highest numeric gain in the nation.

    Lucy A. Puniwai
    REALTOR®
    (214)783-6416 – Cell/Text
    (682)224-8050 – Fax
    puniwai@fathomrealty.com
    Facebook:
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    http://www.puniwai.fathomdallas.com/agents/6440-Lucy-Puniwai
               
    In God We Trust

  • How to apply for GE PLANT IN JUSTIN,TEXAS

    Posted Under: General Area in Denton County, Quality of Life in Denton County, Home Buying in Denton County  |  August 1, 2012 12:25 PM  |  977 views  |  No comments


    Lucy A. Puniwai
    REALTOR®
    (214)783-6416 – Cell/Text
    (682)224-8050 – Fax
    puniwai@fathomrealty.com
    Facebook:
    https://www.facebook.com/NorthFORTworthRealtor
    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Alliance.Haslet.NorthFort.Worth.TexasRealtor?ref=hl
    http://www.puniwai.fathomdallas.com/agents/6440-Lucy-Puniwai
               
    In God We Trust
  • Justin boots - goes International!

    Posted Under: Quality of Life in Justin, Home Buying in Justin, In My Neighborhood in Justin  |  February 13, 2012 8:38 PM  |  1,812 views  |  No comments

    By Rob Robertson rrobertson@bizpress.net
    Reporter

    Justin Brands has announced plans to expand into new global territories, with new sales and distribution infrastructure geared to answer international interest and demand.

    By Rob Robertson rrobertson@bizpress.net

    Reporter

    Justin Brands has announced plans to expand into new global territories, with new sales and distribution infrastructure geared to answer international interest and demand.

     

    click image to enlarge

    Justin Brands executives Randy Watson, Herb Beckwith and Jamie Morgan. The footwear manufacturer is making a global push in 2012.

    Photo by Glen E. Ellman

    What makes this effort different for the Fort Worth-based footwear company is the push for a much stronger retail presence, backed by a sales force being established worldwide and a robust distribution and logistics plan for each new market.

    “We have received a great deal of interest in our products from international partners, so we’ve focused on meeting those opportunities and creating solutions that meet their customer needs,” said Herb Beckwith, Justin Brands’ CFO and head of international operations. “We are setting up systems based on what’s worked well for us, our retailers and our end consumers here in the United States, to successfully and efficiently carry our brands into new global regions.”

    Beckwith said there had always been a desire to extend the company’s retail presence beyond the United States, but it wasn’t until last spring that the decision was made to move forward with a plan.

    Though he would not give specific numbers, Beckwith said Justin’s sales in Canada were up 37 percent year-over-year from 2010 to 2011, with the biggest gains coming in the fourth quarter. Total international sales for the company were up 47 percent in 2011 from the year before. Customers have been able to buy any of Justin’s five Western boot brands internationally for years via the Internet.

    Domestic sales were up 11.4 percent in the same time period.

    “Let’s just say that was enough to move the needle here,” he said.

    In terms of expansion, Canada will come first, then Central and South America and later Australia. The company is also developing stronger markets in Asia that will get more attention after the Western markets are better established, and finally Europe – though much may depend on how the current European debt crisis plays out, Beckwith said.

    The expansion also includes the immediate addition of four new members to the company’s international sales force that will help establish and maintain relationships with distributors in their own markets.

    Northern exposure

    Justin already has a foothold in Canada, with a warehouse in Calgary that went into operation in October.

    Sales team members are already on the ground in Canada – a market that Beckwith says shares many of the same characteristics, tastes and expectations as the United States, making it a natural jumping-off point.

    “Western Canada – Alberta and British Columbia – is more of a traditional Western boot market,” he said. “As you move east to Manitoba and Ontario the market shifts to a combination of Western and equestrian. Going further east, tastes move further from utility to more of a market about lifestyle.”

    Though all of the company’s brands will be marketed there, Canada’s biggest attraction may be its healthy demand for work boots. Justin’s work boot brand, Justin Original Workboots, has already had some success there, Beckwith said.

    “We just see this as a great opportunity in Canada and we’re going to go up there and see what we can do with it,” Beckwith said. “Justin is already well known in places like Calgary. We’ve just never brought the services up there like we’re going to now.”

    Way down South and beyond

    Central and South American markets are also growing – sales have doubled in the markets that Justin has targeted there – and will be a key part of the company’s new sales and service initiatives, Beckwith said.

    Western-style and work boots split the bulk of sales in the Latin American markets. Just like in the United States, each brand has its own particular, and devoted, following that the sales force can leverage.

    Nocona, for example – the brand most famous for its iconic 70s posters – has developed an extremely loyal following in Venezuela that has kept the boots popular there for decades. 

    “Nocona is one of our smaller divisions but it has a real following in Venezuela,” Beckwith said. “We’ve been shipping them there for 30 years.”

    Retailers are already in Australia, too, where demand for Western and equestrian styles are most prevalent, said Lisa Lankes, Justin’s head of communications, licensing and social media. Having people on the ground helps keep doing business so far away from home less expensive for the company and for consumers, she said.

    “Our products are primarily sold there through middle men who mark up prices before they reach the consumer,” she said. “We think there is a whole lot of opportunity in Australia because, based on the model we’re establishing in Canada, we think we can work around that.”

    Beckwith said a warehouse will likely be established in Australia later this year.

    Challenges remain

    One ongoing challenge regardless of market is getting the word out, Lankes said.

    Lankes’ team must determine the right path through which Justin’s many brands will reach the eyes and ears of potential customers in places where the culture may be as different as the language.

    “In a lot of ways this is a start-up type of operation,” she said. “We have a lot of products that work, but certain countries will demand different things.”

    “Beyond logistics are cultural issues that you really need to be cognizant of,” added Beckwith. “You may need to add a little twist here and there to reach new markets.”

    Lankes said the company already offers different takes on some styles that reflect the peculiar demands of certain markets. The company’s Chippewa brand, for example, is popular in Japan with white crepe rubber outsoles.

    “It’s just little things like that that you have to be able to do,” she said. “It’s still Chippewa, it’s still our brand, and it still works.”

    Justin Brands has been a Berkshire Hathaway subsidiary since 2000. It manufactures and markets boots under the Tony Lama, Justin Boots, Nocona Boots, Chippewa Boots and Justin Original Workboots brands. The company also makes and markets work, safety and sports footwear.

    click image to enlarge

    Justin Brands executives Randy Watson, Herb Beckwith and Jamie Morgan. The footwear manufacturer is making a global push in 2012.

    Photo by Glen E. Ellman

    What makes this effort different for the Fort Worth-based footwear company is the push for a much stronger retail presence, backed by a sales force being established worldwide and a robust distribution and logistics plan for each new market.

    “We have received a great deal of interest in our products from international partners, so we’ve focused on meeting those opportunities and creating solutions that meet their customer needs,” said Herb Beckwith, Justin Brands’ CFO and head of international operations. “We are setting up systems based on what’s worked well for us, our retailers and our end consumers here in the United States, to successfully and efficiently carry our brands into new global regions.”

    Beckwith said there had always been a desire to extend the company’s retail presence beyond the United States, but it wasn’t until last spring that the decision was made to move forward with a plan.

    Though he would not give specific numbers, Beckwith said Justin’s sales in Canada were up 37 percent year-over-year from 2010 to 2011, with the biggest gains coming in the fourth quarter. Total international sales for the company were up 47 percent in 2011 from the year before. Customers have been able to buy any of Justin’s five Western boot brands internationally for years via the Internet.

    Domestic sales were up 11.4 percent in the same time period.

    “Let’s just say that was enough to move the needle here,” he said.

    In terms of expansion, Canada will come first, then Central and South America and later Australia. The company is also developing stronger markets in Asia that will get more attention after the Western markets are better established, and finally Europe – though much may depend on how the current European debt crisis plays out, Beckwith said.

    The expansion also includes the immediate addition of four new members to the company’s international sales force that will help establish and maintain relationships with distributors in their own markets.

    Northern exposure
    Justin already has a foothold in Canada, with a warehouse in Calgary that went into operation in October.

    Sales team members are already on the ground in Canada – a market that Beckwith says shares many of the same characteristics, tastes and expectations as the United States, making it a natural jumping-off point.

    “Western Canada – Alberta and British Columbia – is more of a traditional Western boot market,” he said. “As you move east to Manitoba and Ontario the market shifts to a combination of Western and equestrian. Going further east, tastes move further from utility to more of a market about lifestyle.”

    Though all of the company’s brands will be marketed there, Canada’s biggest attraction may be its healthy demand for work boots. Justin’s work boot brand, Justin Original Workboots, has already had some success there, Beckwith said.

    “We just see this as a great opportunity in Canada and we’re going to go up there and see what we can do with it,” Beckwith said. “Justin is already well known in places like Calgary. We’ve just never brought the services up there like we’re going to now.”

    Way down South and beyond
    Central and South American markets are also growing – sales have doubled in the markets that Justin has targeted there – and will be a key part of the company’s new sales and service initiatives, Beckwith said.

    Western-style and work boots split the bulk of sales in the Latin American markets. Just like in the United States, each brand has its own particular, and devoted, following that the sales force can leverage.

    Nocona, for example – the brand most famous for its iconic 70s posters – has developed an extremely loyal following in Venezuela that has kept the boots popular there for decades. 

    “Nocona is one of our smaller divisions but it has a real following in Venezuela,” Beckwith said. “We’ve been shipping them there for 30 years.”

    Retailers are already in Australia, too, where demand for Western and equestrian styles are most prevalent, said Lisa Lankes, Justin’s head of communications, licensing and social media. Having people on the ground helps keep doing business so far away from home less expensive for the company and for consumers, she said.

    “Our products are primarily sold there through middle men who mark up prices before they reach the consumer,” she said. “We think there is a whole lot of opportunity in Australia because, based on the model we’re establishing in Canada, we think we can work around that.”

    Beckwith said a warehouse will likely be established in Australia later this year.

    Challenges remain
    One ongoing challenge regardless of market is getting the word out, Lankes said.

    Lankes’ team must determine the right path through which Justin’s many brands will reach the eyes and ears of potential customers in places where the culture may be as different as the language.

    “In a lot of ways this is a start-up type of operation,” she said. “We have a lot of products that work, but certain countries will demand different things.”

    “Beyond logistics are cultural issues that you really need to be cognizant of,” added Beckwith. “You may need to add a little twist here and there to reach new markets.”

    Lankes said the company already offers different takes on some styles that reflect the peculiar demands of certain markets. The company’s Chippewa brand, for example, is popular in Japan with white crepe rubber outsoles.

    “It’s just little things like that that you have to be able to do,” she said. “It’s still Chippewa, it’s still our brand, and it still works.”

    Justin Brands has been a Berkshire Hathaway subsidiary since 2000. It manufactures and markets boots under the Tony Lama, Justin Boots, Nocona Boots, Chippewa Boots and Justin Original Workboots brands. The company also makes and markets work, safety and sports footwear.

     

  • Vaquero Club approves $4.5M capital improvement plan

    Posted Under: Quality of Life in Westlake, Home Buying in Westlake, In My Neighborhood in Westlake  |  January 11, 2012 12:39 PM  |  1,963 views  |  No comments

    Members of the private Vaquero Club in Westlake have voted overwhelmingly in favor of a $4.5M capital improvement plan to improve services and amenities, including enhancements to the golf course and clubhouse.
    Last year the club, working with the Tom Fazio Design Team, approved a long-term master plan for the golf course that includes a complete renovation of all greenside and native bunkering, several strategic hole changes and the planting of hundreds of trees.

    Tree planting will begin in early 2012, with golf course construction scheduled to start around June 1, 2012. Expected completion of the project is mid-September 2012, with an additional 4-6 week grow-in period.

    Dining space in the clubhouse also will be expanded by about 2000 square feet, the club said. Construction is estimated to start in the spring of 2012, with services continuing during construction.

    The 525-acre Vaquero Club was originally developed in 2001 and was turned over to the membership in September of 2009.

  • Roanoke,Texas I am your Realtor!

    Posted Under: General Area in Roanoke, Quality of Life in Roanoke, Home Buying in Roanoke, In My Neighborhood in Roanoke  |  November 15, 2011 10:02 PM  |  1,464 views  |  No comments

     

     

    http://puniwai.fathomdallas.com/agents/6440-Lucy-Puniwai

    AllianceTexas, the sprawling Hillwood Properties development in far north Fort Worth, boosted its economic impact in the city in 2010, pushing the development's overall impact past $40 billion for the first time, executives said today. In his annual update to the Fort Worth City Council, Hillwood President Mike Berry said the 17,000-acre Alliance had an economic impact of $2.14 billion in 2010, up from $2.03 billion in 2009. But the development has reached a $40.6 billion economic impact from 1990 through 2010, he said.

    The amount of property taxes paid also slightly improved last year, reaching $109.7 million, up more than 1 percent from 2009. Property taxes paid were flat in 2009 from 2008. Since 1990, $948.5 million in property taxes have been paid to Fort Worth, Haslet, Roanoke, Tarrant and Denton counties, and the Keller and Northwest school districts. Westlake shared in the property taxes for the first time in 2010, earning $662,844.

    Hillwood said 30,476 jobs have been created at Alliance in the past two decades, as well as 31,353 construction jobs and 73,406 indirect jobs. Alliance now has 265 companies.

    In other figures, Alliance has developed 31.8 million square feet of office, industrial and retail space, and built 7,645 houses, 200 hotels rooms and 288 apartments.

    Leading the development in 2010 was growth at the Alliance Town Center, which has continued into this year with the January opening of a Kroger Marketplace and the August announcement of a 14-screen Cinemark movie theater. Construction also began on Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital Alliance and an adjoining office complex, as well as an emergency room for North Hills Hospital.

    By the end of 2012, Hillwood said it expects Alliance Town Center to have a value of $344 million and annual sales tax revenues of $3.1 billion.

    "Just seven years ago, Alliance Town Center was nothing more than an empty field," Berry said. "Today it represents one of the fastest-growing retail centers in North Texas."

    Also this year, Deloitte opened its $300 million Deloitte University training center at Circle T Ranch and FedEx announced a heavy-cargo hauling facility, bringing 115 jobs.

    Just recently, well-known Texas economist Ray Perryman named the building of Fort Worth Alliance Airport as one of the top 10 economic events for North Texas in the past 50 years.

    In 1990, Alliance had an economic impact of $846 million.

    Sandra Baker, 817-390-7727



    Read more:
    http://www.star-telegram.com/2011/11/15/3527228/hillwood-alliance-economic-impact.html#ixzz1dqQzo6z6


     

     

  • Roanoke,Texas - Schools - I am YOUR Roanoke,TX Realtor

    Posted Under: General Area in Roanoke, Schools in Roanoke, Home Buying in Roanoke, In My Neighborhood in Roanoke  |  November 14, 2011 10:11 PM  |  1,514 views  |  No comments

    ROANOKE -- Like other Roanoke Elementary parents, Robbie Terrell had mixed feelings two years ago when she learned that her son would be moving into a brand new school in a new neighborhood while their old school was converted into a new alternative high school.

    "Many parents wanted their kids in the new facility," said Terrell, president of Roanoke's PTA. "We wanted to stay together because we have a strong sense of community."

    And that's what happened. Terrell's oldest son went on to Medlin Middle School. Her middle son joined the Roanoke dual-language program. And her preschooler waited his turn to attend the sparkling new school in the Briarwyke subdivision.

    Before the first year was over, however, the new school had exceeded its 650-student capacity by 100 students. And a Northwest school district long-range planning committee began looking at ways to continue housing the influx of students without overextending a budget already stretched to the limits by state spending cuts.

    The answer, the committee recommended and school trustees approved, was to build additions onto schools that had exceeded or about to exceed their 650-student capacity. Increasing capacity to 850 at both old and new schools could save the district $3 million in operating costs and $100 million in construction costs over the next five years, the committee said.

    Roanoke will be the first school to benefit from the extra capacity.

    By next month, construction crews will begin working on a 12,000-square-foot addition to the 84,000-square-foot school, said Assistant Superintendent Dennis McCreary.He said the extra space will include six regular classrooms, additional art and music rooms and expansions of the cafeteria and gym to accommodate the additional students.

    While teaching in a construction zone sounds a bit formidable, Roanoke staff say they're up to the tasks just as they've created space to serve extra students this fall.

    School librarian Kelley Valdez said classes were created from space previously used for special programs or meeting rooms. One room was split in half for the dual language program that Terrell's son attends.

    "That works well because it's small," Valdez said.

    Valdez and Terrell are confident in McCreary's assurance that construction won't disrupt classes_ especially not testing.

    "They put up a wall during the school day with no distraction, so I know they're really working to have as few disruptions for us as they can," Valdez said. "The trick will be knowing how to get from place to place as they're adding on different areas."

    Terrell, who now teaches first grade at Roanoke, said students also are taking the changes in stride.

    "My son is in one of the classes they had to knock a wall down," she said. "I don't feel my son missed out on anything. No one was in a hallway. They may have been in a smaller room for awhile but with the quality of staff and teachers here, we can handle it."

    Martha Deller, 817-390-7857

  • Target to open distribution center in Denton - 250 jobs

    Posted Under: Quality of Life in Denton County, Home Buying in Denton County, In My Neighborhood in Denton County  |  November 8, 2011 9:49 PM  |  1,698 views  |  No comments

    Target Corp.    will build a distribution center in Denton that will open in March 2013.

    The Dallas Morning News reported that the 360,000-square-foot facility will supply about 235 stores in Texas, Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Mississippi, Oklahoma and Tennessee.

    The facility is at 3952 Corbin road and will handle 30 million cartons of food a year, theMorning News reported.

    Target (NYSE: TGT) had been supplying its stores with Supervalu Inc.    , but the new facility will double the capacity of the Supervalu Fort Worth facility, the newspaper reported. At least 250 construction jobs will be created, the Morning News reported.

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